Just Say Yes A fellow artist informed me that Mount Horeb Driftless Historium had two weeks to find a new display for their their large street windows walk-up gallery and would l like to display my watercolor paintings.  Two weeks, was he crazy?  How do you set up a show in just two weeks?  How many paintings, what was the theme, how much room would I have to fill, what kind of advertising and posters?  So many questions, so little time.   I immediately went into cynic mode and texted him back saying no, just not enough time.  He said he would inform the 14 South Artists organization we belong to and see if any of the other artists would be interested.  Working quickly because of the short turn around time, he sent off a post on Facebook.   Earlier that day, I had listened to a motivational podcast about another artist that had finished a new collection and was looking for place to show them.  Covid hit and nothing was available.  All she wanted was a big enough room to hang her work to take photographs.  Then, all of a sudden a space became available for a short period of time

I have been working on a series of paintings I call my Creative Workbench Series.  I have done a Jewelers bench, a chaotic innovator’s bench, and a fly tying bench and now I am working on a small engine bench.  Technically this isn’t a bench, but it is a collection of items used to work on small engines, so it is an acceptable alternative to a bench. Identifying the Problem I thought I had made pretty good progress on my Small Engine watercolor painting until my husband looked over my shoulder and said, “It looks great but your plastic box is out of perspective”.  Well, when did he get to be an expert, I just ran him off and told him it looked great.   The next morning I had a message from my mentor saying she loved the progress on the painting but the plastic box looks a little out of perspective.   Apparently my plastic box is out of perspective,  which left me with a choice:  To Fix, change the plastic box perspective. Not to Fix, leave it alone. If I painted with oil or acrylics, no problem, I would just paint over the offending wonky plastic box and fix

Ask More Questions I had finished some pretty intense, detailed paintings and I had not figured out what my next project should be and mentioned this to a friend.  She spends her winters in Hawaii and thought she might like a couple of new paintings for her house.  I asked her what she would like and she said a whale and an octopus.  Excellent, I have done a whale before and I like octopuses, so I agreed.  I proceeded as if I knew what I was doing and painted the sperm whale painting (above).  I was pretty happy with it, the whale appears to be coming out of the dark ocean background and sunlight ripples over it’s back.   Failure to Launch I sent her a photo of the painting and she liked it well enough, but she wanted a humpback whale with a baby whale.  One more question would have been useful to have determined the kind of whale she liked.  I did proceed to create a sperm whale and baby painting, that I believe she loves.  If anyone is interested in this Sperm Whale painting let me know and we can make a deal. Beholders Don’t Always Know What

      “We don’t stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing.”      George Bernard Shaw What does Childlike Wonder Look Like It was a beautiful cool Saturday and I was sitting near my art booth when two small boys (5 and 7) came running over to see myTiny Wonders original watercolors.  I had one painting of a vintage red race car and the older boy just had to pick it up and look it over very carefully.  The younger child quickly checked out all the other paintings and was squealing with delight.  I could not have been more pleased.  It was refreshing to see how my paintings brought out so much joy in these young people. Where Did Our Wonder Go A little later there was a young man, perhaps around 26 who also came over to the admire the Tiny Wonders.  He looked at all the paintings quite intently and after awhile I said hello and made a comment on the weather.  I explained all paintings were originals and he confessed his admiration for my work.  You could see delight in his eyes but no squealing like the young boys.  He

I live in an area of Wisconsin known at the Driftless Area.  I am not a geological expert, but I understand during the ice age, the glacier covered most of Wisconsin and skirted this area leaving a completely different landscape with unique rock formations.  This driftless concept was never explained to me during my informative years and has only recently been thrust forward because of my interest in watercolor painting.  I began hearing this driftless term when looking for art shows and found some special shows devoted to driftless area artists.  Then recently when our local historical museum expanded, it reinvented itself as the Driftless Historium, kind of a cool name with a bit of a Victorian nature.  In my quest for locations to display my watercolor paintings, I approached the Driftless Historium with some new products and as a result, they suggested I paint prairie flowers because they fall into their Driftless concept. I have done several floral watercolor paintings and this seemed to be a logical step, helped limit my scope of subjects and I found myself in research mode.  During the research process, I found a local remnant prairie on Instagram called Moely Prairie.  It is only

A couple of months ago my son jokingly sent me a message with a photo of his workbench.  It was just full of stuff,  some in-process work, tools, along with some adult beverages.  I laughed when I saw the photo, knowing that my son is extremely inventive, but tends to have too many projects at varying stages of completion.  When I saw the photo, I thought the workbench was a visual interpretation of the many synapses firing in his brain.  Too many to control requiring the need of some fluid refreshments to slow down the impulses.  It was a crazy photo, but after a while I thought wow, wouldn’t that make a great painting. This started me down the path of a new series I am calling Creative Workbenches.  It will be an intimate look at a variety of work spaces from a diverse group of creative sources.  I have enlisted the help of a jeweler who fixes watches and clock and a fly fisherman who ties his own flies.  I hope to recruit additional artisans over time.   One thing I am learning about creative workbenches is how intimate this project is becoming.  How a person lays out their work

I was searching the World Wide Web about a year ago when I came across an article about ACEOs.  What the heck is an ACEO I wondered?  Well it is an Art Card Edition or Original.  Okay, that makes no sense at all, so I searched for more information and it turns out there are a world of collectors that buy paintings specifically made on 2.5 x 3.5 inch cards.  Ebay appears to be the best buy and sell for ACEOs.   I thought, with my level of patience, maybe I should start making ACEOs and selling them.  I can make a complete painting in 1 to 3 hours, mount them and sell them at art shows and my followers can have an original artwork for less than $50.  And so, I have created over 30 tiny water media paintings in the last year.  They are so much fun and rewarding. Well I looked into the “tiny” art concept a little more and found out there are a lot of different definitions of tiny art and there seems to be a difference in maximum size for these art pieces, some ranging up to 10 x 10 inches. That was kind of

My Big Boy Painting Journey starts with a blank piece of paper, the most fearful stage of the journey.  The idea is in my head, I even have a tiny test painting I laid out to see how it might look, but actually starting a painting is the hardest part.  All my fears of inadequacy come to the surface.  Thoughts like, “Am I good enough; is it too hard; will anyone like it; can I satisfy the viewer, etc”.  The other side is I can’t wait to see how it will look when I am done, but I know it will be a long time until it is complete.  I don’t work fast as a rule because I get a bit bogged down in details.  In this case, the Big Boy Steam Locomotive is an historical engine and there are many people that would look closely and critique my work if I get the detail wrong.  So much angst placed on one piece of paper. It is time to start.  Most of the time I would draw my image on the paper either free hand, or by using a grid to transfer the image.  In this case, because the details

Tuesday morning, April 9th, I saw an Instagram video of Wingra dam jumping muskies starting to jump the Wingra Lake dam in Madison, WI.   I am 60+ years old and have lived in the Madison area all my life and never knew about this interesting phenomenon until last year when I saw a You Tube video,  Wingra Jumping Muskies.  I was pretty excited when I learned that the Muskies where starting their annual jumping and wanted to go see them. I told my husband that he should go check it out with his son when they went into Madison to work that morning, but Dave thought he could wait.  I said, not waiting, today was the day, it was was 60 degrees F and the next day it was suppose to be below freezing and snowing.  I explained to him that my father was the type of guy that new when there was something special going on, that work could wait.  I told him that when I was a kid, about every other year the DNR would “shock” the Mt. Vernon Creek to check on the health of the trout and throw out the suckers.  When dad heard they were

In November I was extended the opportunity to exhibit some of my artwork in a Reedsburg Bed and Breakfast.  I didn’t have enough available pieces to meet their entire needs, so I started coming up with ideas of what would be interesting for their guests.  One of the attractions in this area is the International Crane Foundation in Baraboo, WI, so I thought it would be interesting to paint a crane.   I checked out their website and they had some wonderful photos, but there was one that really appealed to me and that was the Siberian Crane in the drop wing threat pose.  I thought how appropriate to paint a threatened species in threat mode.  I asked permission to use that image as a reference photo and they kindly agreed. I was a little intimidated at first because I typically paint small pictures (less than 10 inches on the longest side) and this was going to be 18 x 24 inches, which is huge from my perspective.  Facing the big, blank piece of watercolor paper started all kinds of negative thinking on my part, it took me several days to figure out how I was going to sketch out the