Going Fishing My father introduced me to fishing when I was a toddler most likely as respectable excuse to get out of the house for some quiet time.  I have learned over the years there are people that like to “go fishing” and then there are “Fishermen”.  My dad and his dad before him were more the “I am going fishing” type.  I think my mom and grandma had a lot to do with the timing of the fishing trips (enough said about that), but I was often rewarded by these outings.  Dad would take me down the gravel pit and we would would casually sit on the bank “fishing” and pull in a bullhead or two and eventually make our way back home for supper.  We would eat, dad would recline and nap and all was well with the world. Later in life I married a “Fisherman”.  Fishing was a command performance, every moment spent on the water or bank had to be meaningful and it was a job.  Two weeks after we were married, I moved with him to Alaska, a fisherman’s paradise.  We spent the summer chasing salmon, King, Red, and Silver.  Long days were spent

Is There a Difference In my first watercolor class the instructor placed before us a cloth lined table with an orchid in a vase, a few other objects and told us to paint.  I have to admit, that was a little overwhelming.  I hadn’t even learned how to use watercolor at that point and wasn’t sure on how to approach this set of items in a drawing.  This was my first exposure to still life painting. Still Life Painting The instructor had laid before us a still life composition to use to study shapes and colors.  The still life had no meaning to me or anyone, so there was no emotional connection to this grouping.  Grouping objects together and taking them out of context allowed us as artists to introduce our own interpretation to create a mood or emotion.  As the artist I provide the interpretation and the objects speak for themselves without reflecting on the owner.  The Beholder further interprets the artwork through their own experience and becomes a co-creator in the process in the finished piece.   One of my examples of a still life is the “Daisy and Teapot” painting. I used a few items that I was

Creative I have been working on a series of paintings I call “Creative Workbenches” and I am discovering that this term doesn’t make any sense to people.  If you Google Creative Workbench you will find photos and ads for tables and benches that can be arranged “creatively”.  I don’t think they consider the person using the workbench as the “Creative”.  Maybe my title of the series should have an apostrophe, like “Creative’s Workbenches” and that would make more sense.  Please send comments if you think I should change the title of the series.  I can adapt.   I Can Adapt The term “I can adapt” may actually be a better name for Creative.  A Creative is a person who can solve problems, find a new way to do something, make something new, use their imagination, prepare a new meal, search for the lost sock, adapt a new tool, write a new code, do jig-saw puzzles, or fix a faucet.  In all honesty, everyone that gets up in the morning and chooses their wardrobe for the day is creative.  We are all creative by design.   So why did I have so much trouble finding people willing to provide photo’s of their Creative

Starting Point I am working on Creative Workbench Encaustic Wax Pans.  This new Creative Workbench features an encaustic artist painting bench.  If you are not familiar with encaustic paintings, they are paintings made with hot colored blend of beeswax.  The wax is painted or dripped onto the surface and built up in layers.  It is a fascinating medium provided intriguing results.  The artist workbench is from Shary Bartlett, and she graciously is allowing me to use her reference photo.   Underpainting In order to preserve the white or light highlights on the pans, I put mastic fluid everywhere that should remain white.  That shows up on the image as a teal blue tint.  Once that was dried, I used a neutral tint paint to define the areas of shadow.  This underpainting will help the color appear darker and create contrast. Glazing With the underpainting in place, it was time to add color.  I started by adding thin layers of color, this would still be considered light values.  Later I will move into mid-tone values, but you will have to check later to see how this project progress.  I will add new images of the progress over time. Midway I am about

A couple of months ago my son jokingly sent me a message with a photo of his work space.  It was just full of stuff,  some in-process work, tools, along with some adult beverages.  I laughed when I saw the photo, knowing that my son is extremely inventive, but tends to have too many projects at varying stages of completion.  When I saw the photo, I thought the workbench was a visual interpretation of the many synapses firing in his brain.  Too many to control requiring the need of some fluid refreshments to slow down the impulses.  It was a crazy photo, but after a while I thought wow, wouldn’t that make a great painting. This started me down the path of a new series I am calling Creative Workbenches.  It will be an intimate look at a variety of work spaces from a diverse group of creative sources.  I have enlisted the help of a jeweler who fixes watches and clock and a fly fisherman who ties his own flies.  I hope to recruit additional artisans over time.   One thing I am learning about creative work spaces is how intimate this project is becoming.  How a person lays out